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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
in las vegas, alexis wineman, miss montana, beaming like the others as they compete for the crown. but hers is a journey unlike any other. the little girl with the big smile but hiding underneath it, a giant hurdle. >> we knew for a long time there was something wrong, we just didn't know what it was. >> reporter: the little girl unable to relate to other children at school. the unexplained tantrums. the hours spent alone. she had autism but her parents and teachers didn't know it. one teacher saying, i don't get paid enough to handle this. no one talked about it in her small montana town. she wasn't diagnosed until she was 11 and no one thought she would ever make it here. at 18, alexis defied the odds. the first contestant with autism to compete in miss america. so you've had a little practice? >> oh, yes. >> reporter: and for the talent portion she plans a stand-up act. this is where you have to be funny up there. >> yes. i'm always funny up there. >> reporter: the same little girl who will tell you she never got the jokes. how did you know you were funny? >> i use it to deal w
ms. america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alo alone. >> i was very quiet, because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana, didn't have the resources to help figure out what it was. and then at the age of 11, after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor finally put a name to wineman's condition. pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent. but very quiet. socially awkward. and they don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically, they don't end up becoming beauty queens, either. but wineman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i wanted to accept myself and my autism. and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> reporter: she entered the ms. montana pageant as a way to prove to herself she could do anything she set her mind to.
in las vegas, to meet alexis wineman, miss montana, with all of the others as they compete for the crown. but her journey unlike any other, her family telling us the stories of the little girl unable to relate to the little girls at school, the hours spent alone, she had autism but they didn't know it. the teacher who once said i don't get paid enough to handle this. but 11 years old, finally answer. a diagnosis. no one thought she would make it here. i'm david. good to meet you. at 18, alexis has defied the odds. the first contestant with autism to compete in miss america. she came with a message for other children with special needs. what do you say to other young people who feel alone? >> i wish they would embrace themselves for who they are. >> reporter: and when she didn't have any friends growing up, i heard you had one best friend? >> oh, yes. in the fourth grade, i had a giant winnie the pooh doll. >> reporter: winnie the pooh, still loyal today. there are so many young women here who have defied the odds from small-town america. from ohio, miss fallen timbers. miss wyoming finan
. that package heads to the senate after the president's inauguration. >>> alexis, wineman grew up knowing she was not like any other kids, but it wasn't until she turned 11 that she really found out why. here's dr. sanjay gupta with the story of a girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> reporter: miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other bo beauty queens on stage. for most of her life, alexis, wineman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet. i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there wassing ing ssomething w their small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11, a doctor finely put the name to wineman's condition, pervasive development disorder, a mile form of autism. typically children with autism are intelligent but very quiet. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either. but wineman said one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i wanted to accept myself and my autism and i realized that my autism d
expect quite a bit. >> thank you so much from new york. alexis wineman grew up knowing she was not like other kids, but not until she turned 11 she found out why. the story of this girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> miss montana surrounded by 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life. alexis wineman spent time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong, but the small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor put a name to wineman's condition. pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. >> children with autism are very intelligent, but very quiet and socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't become beauty queens either, but one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myse
history. miss montana, alexis, is the first miss america contestant diagnosed with autism. she said she used to spend hours alone in her room refuse to go talk to anyone. even though she was considered highly functioning, she was ridiculed because of a speech impediment and intense shyness. >> growing up, i was a loner, i barely hung out with anyone. i would stay in my room for hours just not wanting to talk to anyone. the girl you are seeing now is not the same girl you would have saw ten years ago. i have overcome so many of my symptoms. >> alexis credits her family with helping her become comfortable with herself. she said that enabled her to get out and try new things. >>> another contestant has made a difficult decision, miss district of columbia, alex rose, plans to undergo a double mastectomy after the competition whether she wins or loses. she's taking action to prevent breast kansas which are claimed the lives of her mother, grandmother, ain't and great-aunt. her mom was diagnosed in 2007. the competition is tonight at 9:00 right here on abc7. >>> well, tomorrow expect some bar
history. miss montana, alexis wineman, is the first miss america contestant diagnosed with autism. she said she used to spend hours alone in her room refuse to go talk to anyone. even though she was considered highly functioning, she was ridiculed because of a speech impediment and intense shyness. >> growing up, i was a loner, i barely hung out with anyone. i would stay in my room for hours just not wanting to talk to anyone. the girl you are seeing now is not the same girl you would have saw ten years ago. i have overcome so many of my symptoms. >> alexis credits her family with helping her become comfortable with herself. she said that enabled her to get out and try new things. >> you can see how she does in the 2013 miss america competition tonight at nine right here on abc7. something else you can expect. tomorrow some bart riders will be a bit underdressed as in they will not be wearing any pants. organizers improv everywhere have declared tomorrow to be the day for the twelfth annual no pants subway ride. the no pants party starts boarding around noon with a group photo planned
contestant making history. miss montana, alexis wineman, is going to be the first contestant with autism. >> reporter: she is an incredible woman. she is the first contestant with autism. and the youngest contestant. and she's not letting any of it keep her from her dream. in a competition filled with smiles, struts and sass, the reigning miss montana looks like she fits right in. >> holy crap. i'm going to be on miss america. >> reporter: but fitting in has never been easy for 18-year-old alexis wineman. >> growing up, i was alone a lot. i barely hung out with anyone. and that's because i was afraid of being laughed at. >> reporter: she is the first miss america contestant to be diagnosed with autism, which was discovered when she was just 11 years old. >> i would stay in my room for hours, not wanting to talk to anyone. >> reporter: even though she was considered highly functioning, she said she was ridiculed because of her speech impediment and intense shyness. >> the girl you're seeing right now, is not the same girl you would have seen ten years ago. i've overcome so many of my symp
schwartzman. now i'd like to recognize alexis herman. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you so much. and i am so very pleased to announce after yesterday's glorious inauguration and perhaps a late-night celebration that 317 democratic national committee members have registered in person for this meeting, and where 47, for a total 364 out of 460 members. so yes, madam chair, our democratic national committee is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc memb
coming up. then meet miss montana, alexis wineman could be the next miss america and she's the first ever diagnosed with autism to compete. stick around hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robitussin®. don't suffer the coughequences™. >> brian: now your news by the numbers. 40%. that's how much health premiums could go up for people between the age of 21 to 29. in 2014. you hear that, gretchen? the concern, according to a new study, is because an influx of relatively healthy people will tip the balance away from those who the media helps immediate. next, tenth place. matt damon's movie ends up in tenth place. it made 4 million bucks in its opening weekend. 15%. that's how much more you'll have to pay for this new anheuser-busch beer called black crown. it will be stronger a
life, alexis wineman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong, but their small town of cutbank, montana, didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at age 11, after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor finally put a name to her condition -- pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent. but very quiet. socially awkward, and they don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either. but wineman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to really accept myself and my autism. and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageants as a way to prove to herself she could do anything she set her mind to. >> i fell in love with the program. good thing, too, because i won. i wasn'
to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at the age of 11, a doctor finally put a name to her condition. pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent but very quiet. socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically, they don't end up becoming beauty queens either but she says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myself and my autism and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageant as a way to problem she could do anything. >> i fell in love with the program, good thing too because i won. i wasn't expecting to win but it's funny how things work
. sanjay gupta introduces us to alexis weinman in this week's "human factor." miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other beauty queens on stage all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life she spent her time alone. >> i was quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong but the small town of cut bank, montana, didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers a doctor finally put a name to weinman's division, pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent but very quiet, socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either but weinman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i wanted to accept myself and my autism and i realized my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> reporter: s
on to wisconsin. we'll send it back to alexis davies in for danella. >>> thank you, two southbound lanes are closed on route 355 wisconsin avenue between cumberland avenue and dorset avenue. elsewhere, 270 seeing delays as you head out of frederick this morning and as you approach the [ male announcer ] now at your neighborhood subway: the big hot pastrami melt. we perfected the pastrami sandwich -- filled with hot, juicy pastrami, pickles, yellow mustard and bubbly melted cheese. all piled-high on our signature freshly baked bread. made hot, toasty and just for you. and don't be afraid to put your spin on this deli style deliciousity -- add your favorite ingredients, like spicy jalapeÑos or crisp green peppers. get to your local subway and taste some perfect pastrami today! subway. eat fresh. >>> good morning, sun just now coming up over the potomac and a clearing sky. live view and the sun will be with us throughout the rest of the daylight hours with temperatures struggle to get above freezing over the next hour so right now reagan national at 31. elsewhere, down into the low to mid
is a student in montclair, new jersey. caller: good morning. alexis a professor of -- i would like to say to professor gee. [laughter] i am sorry, -- '08. [laughter] i am sorry, that was an inside joke. i have a difficult time getting my mind wrapped around this idea that it is now here in new jersey were i mr. and is now about $18,000 a year. -- where i am a student is now .bout $18,000 a year towar when you look at models like what mit is doing and some of these other online learning platforms, do you think that maybe the days of the large, centralized university, those days are numbered? do you think there is a place in the academic process for those kinds of platforms, and whether it ought to be looking at accreditation for those kinds of learning experiences -- we ough cokiet to be looking -- we ought to be looking at accreditation for those kinds of learning experiences? maybe students can test out clauses based on their academic -- of classes based on their academic experience, an increase graduation rates. ease graduationras rates. now i am finishing up my degree in computer scien
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)